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Kola
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Username: Kola

Post Number: 2279
Registered: 02-2005

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Posted on Friday, November 11, 2005 - 06:13 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was hoping that George Weah would win the election in LIBERIA....

but at least we have Africa's FIRST woman President out of it! :-)

Hopefully, she won't let Europe and the U.S.
do too much damage.



Ellen



Monrovia - Her ancestors were slaves in North America - and now Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf is set to become the first woman ever to be elected president of an African nation.


The 66-year-old has finally achieved the office she has striven for several times. She has the reputation of an 'Iron Lady' - wilful, a woman of integrity.

She has made her name as a finance expert. Now many Liberians are hoping she will be able to use her international contacts to secure aid for a country ruined by conflict.

Johnson-Sirleaf married at 17, bore four sons, and was finance minister at 40. In those days the country was ruled by William Tolbert, a representative of the despised Americo-Liberian elite.

These are the successors of the liberated slaves who founded Liberia in the 19th Century - and proceeded to treat the locally-born like the colonials had before them.

Johnson-Sirleaf rejects ever having been of them. 'If such a class existed,' she has often said, 'it has been obliterated over the last few years from intermarriages and social integration.'

During the ensuing military rule of Samuel Doe she went into exile in the United States, studying economics at Harvard, and later securing a good job at the World Bank.

Civil war was by then consuming her homeland. Militia chief Charles Taylor had toppled Doe and had him tortured to death.

In 1996 he agreed to the forming of an interim government headed by a woman - Ruth Perry, Africa's first woman president, but who in contrast to John-Sirleaf was not elected.

Johnson-Sirleaf made her first tilt at the presidency in 1997, losing against Taylor who had threatened a resumption of civil war in the event of him losing.

The conflict flared up again anyway - and did not end until two years ago, when Taylor was forced into exile by the West African ECOWAS community of states.

Johnson-Sirleaf took another tilt at the presidency, but this time former civil war opponents reached agreement on appointing Gyude Bryant, a man considered neutral.

Now, in the first election since the end of the 14-year civil conflict, she has managed to gain the presidency in a run-off vote against 39-year-old football icon George Weah.

What will she do? 'This is not the time to come and learn on the job,' she has said.

'This is the time to come and do it, the time to perform and achieve, the time to get Liberians out of the psychological, and economic and political wreckages of war and enthrone true democracy.'

Asked if Africa was ready for a woman president in its midst, she is typically forthright.

'Africa is ready for a female president,' she has insisted. 'Women have the education, the character, the competence, and the integrity to lead the nation.

'Today, many African women are proving their leadership abilities, both in private and public sectors, making giant strides and succeeding CEOs. Sooner or later, people will realize that both genders own this world together.'


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Kola
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Post Number: 2280
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Posted on Friday, November 11, 2005 - 06:21 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

From the article:



These are the successors of the liberated slaves who founded Liberia in the 19th Century - and proceeded to treat the locally-born like the colonials had before them.

Johnson-Sirleaf rejects ever having been of them. 'If such a class existed,' she has often said, 'it has been obliterated over the last few years from intermarriages and social integration.'






Her constant denial is the reason that I could never support her.

She is definitely a descendent of that Mulatto group who left the United States and set up Liberia and were worse rulers than the European colonists, and instead of denouncing them---she claims that they never even existed.

Not to mention. She's not truly Liberian and for the people---but is a Harvard Graduate and will do the the bidding of Europe and America.

I just hope she makes sure to GET SOMETHING OUT OF IT for the Liberians. If she does that---then she should be re-elected.




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Roxie
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Post Number: 308
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Posted on Friday, November 11, 2005 - 07:02 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Will african-Liberians EVER get to control their own nation?

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Kola
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Posted on Friday, November 11, 2005 - 07:53 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm hoping that "having to PROVE she's down for the people" will make her do a good job in building Liberia for itself.

I don't dislike her. I just think she's elitist and too American.


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Renata
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Post Number: 183
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Posted on Friday, November 11, 2005 - 08:36 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't know enough about her to like or dislike her. But if she does a good job (which I'm REALLY REALLY PRAYING FOR) I will be glad to tell everyone I know about the good job an AFRICAN woman is doing running a country.

It will also be good for black American girls to see that black women can be at the top if they want. For all of America's moaning about the plight in other countries, it's interesting to see that even male dominated PAKISTAN and Bangladesh has had female leaders before the US.

It will be even better to see a female lead in an African country, especially if she does a good job.

I hope that she knows her being elected wouldn't just be a big deal for Liberia.
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Kola
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Posted on Friday, November 11, 2005 - 08:43 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Renata, where you been? :-)

I'm hoping she really does a good job, too.

What we were discussing is the fact that she's from Liberia's "bougie ruling class" that has historically oppressed the Liberian masses.

The U.S. and Europe were financial backers in getting her elected.

I think George Weah, the legendary soccer star turned politician, would have been a much better choice, despite his inexperience.

But I'm hoping that the pressure for her to prove that she's "for the people of Liberia"---will cause her to shock everyone and be more African centered and not operate like a COLONY.



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Kola
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Posted on Friday, November 11, 2005 - 10:40 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Damn. The PLOT Thickens.

George Weah

Liberians march on US embassy in fury at expected outcome of poll
By Dino Mahtani in Monrovia
Published: November 12 2005 02:00 | Last updated: November 12 2005 02:00

Thousands of angry young Liberian demonstrators yesterday marched on the US embassy in the Liberian capital Monrovia to protest against the almost certain victory of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in the country's presidential elections.


United Nations police guarding the road to the embassy used batons and tear gas to fight back supporters of George Weah, a former international soccer star, who was Mrs Sirleaf's main rival in the presidential run-off. Many of Mr Weah's supporters say the US should intervene to uphold freedom and democracy.

Mrs Sirleaf, a veteran politician and former World Bank economist, was yesterday on the verge of a historic victory that would make her Africa's first female president, winning almost 60 per cent of votes coming in from 97 percent of the polling stations.

Mr Weah, who appeals to the majority of Liberia's youth, who say he is the country's only untainted politician, had earlier this week claimed serious fraud in the elections. His party has accused the election commission of bias and has filed a writ at the country's Supreme Court to stop vote-counting and an official declaration of results. His party has also alleged ballot-stuffing and intimidation at polling booths. International observers have said there is insufficient evidence to support claims the rigging stole the election from Mr Weah.

The developing crisis in the elections represents a fundamental schism in Liberian society between the populist Mr Weah and Mrs Sirleaf, who is perceived by many of Mr Weah's supporters as belonging to an elitist clique that has ruined the country in its quest for power.

Mrs Sirleaf had served under previous Liberian governments and had initially given moral support to Charles Taylor, Liberia's former warlord turned president, who has now been indicted by a UN-backed war crimes court in Sierra Leone.

"I want a neutral person to rule this country, not Ellen Johnson [Sirleaf], who has ruined this country by backing revolutions. We have been used by people like her," said Junior Russ, a former child soldier who fought for three different armed factions during Liberia's war.

Mrs Sirleaf has said she would welcome Mr Weah into her government as part of a process of reunification. "I'd like him to play an important role. I think working together we can do a lot to respond to the needs of our country, particularly the young people," she said late on Thursday.

While Mr Weah has called on his supporters to remain calm, his control over frustrated supporters has been called into question.

He based his campaign on a slogan of "elitism versus grass-rootism", appealing to youths who feel the country has been dominated by the descendants of freed American slaves, who founded Liberia in 1847.



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Kola
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Posted on Friday, November 11, 2005 - 10:43 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I wanted George to win...

but in all fairness. I think he should concede the election and let the vote stand.

He lost by 11 points! He should concede.

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Renata
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Post Number: 184
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Posted on Friday, November 11, 2005 - 11:42 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

11 points ONLY! wow.

I've just not been getting on the internet as much. I want to get back into writing, and internet surfing and tv watching is taking too much of my time.

I now mostly listen to the radio/CD's.
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Afroamerican
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Post Number: 95
Registered: 08-2005

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Posted on Tuesday, November 15, 2005 - 11:42 am:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

lol.

She does NOT look very "Mulatto" descended at all to me- in fact her last name is very un-American to boot! But anyhow, congratulations to her! I wonder how many Afro-American media outlets are reporting on this!
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Anunaki3600
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Post Number: 118
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Posted on Wednesday, November 16, 2005 - 04:46 am:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lets not count the crack babies before they are born. Looks like the Electoral Commission of Liberia has not as yet declared her as the election winner. They have been pressured by "gun-men" to look into election irregularities. Looks like no one wants a repeat of gunmen high on crystal meth, glue and mandrax wearing pink wigs and bra's in the streets of Monrovia again.
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Zuriburi
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Posted on Wednesday, November 16, 2005 - 09:01 am:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I had always hoped and assumed that if women wear 'in charge' in Africa and elsewhere for that matter than the world may have a chance.
It is assumed that our ability to bear children make us more nurturing and compassionate. Obviously there are exceptions to this rule, but I often wonder if 95% of the world leaders were women would humans be better off.

I know this is simplistic thinking and other factors are involved in this case her class may blind her to the needs of many Liberians.

I hope that she does what is right.
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Afroamerican
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Posted on Thursday, November 17, 2005 - 04:55 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The Liberians boards are busy with talk about the new election as well as the role (which I asked ealier) AA's have in the Liberian homeland!

http://www.liberianforum.com/forum/index.php
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Afroamerican
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Posted on Thursday, November 17, 2005 - 05:01 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

http://www.liberianforum.com/history.htm
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Medusa
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Posted on Thursday, November 17, 2005 - 06:37 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

But wouldn't most the posters on an internet board be from the upper class Liberians who are descended from the former slaves anyway?

Not sure I trust this.

I was on a Ghana site and the people on internet were nothing at all like the Ghanians I met in Accra.



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Afroamerican
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Posted on Thursday, November 17, 2005 - 07:15 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would you mind telling me, Medusa, how the Ghanians in Accra were and how they treated YOU?
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Kola
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Posted on Friday, November 18, 2005 - 02:33 pm:   Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Medusa, you don't have to be timid. I know exactly what you're saying.

There is a huge difference between the "Been-to" African and the Native everyday African.

The Been-tos are more "westernized", elitist, self-hating and defensive about Africa. They like to pretend that they're Black American while at the same time--putting down AAs every chance they get.

The natives are "unaware" that there's anything wrong with being black; they love all black people and they're of course---much more blacker and African. Very poor (but don't know it). They're more innocent and traditional. Altogether better people.





And AfroAmerican,

Compared to the general population of LIBERIA...it's very apparent by this woman's looks that she is descended from non-pure people--who in that country would be the American mulattos who once ruled and were massacred by the natives.

I, personally, think that she MIGHT truly want to build Liberia for the people, however, and I wish they'd give her a chance.





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